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Video Production Posts

Color Grading in DaVinci

We’ve covered the basics of color grading in Adobe Premiere, and the details of a professional workflow using DaVinci Resolve and Adobe Premiere. In this episode of our How To Video series, we’re taking it a step further to show you exactly how to color grade your footage with the same software the pros use.

Color grading isn’t just about making sure the reds, greens, and blues are all in balance. It’s also where you can remove blemishes, or highlight specific aspects of your image to get the exact look you want.

Watch the tutorial below and keep reading for an in-depth guide to color grading using DaVinci Resolve.

Color Grading Workflow in DaVinci and Adobe

In the first episode of our color grading tutorial series, we covered basic fundamentals in Adobe Premiere. Now, we’re going to show you how to incorporate DaVinci Resolve, a professional color grading tool, into your Adobe Premiere editing workflow.

Here’s how to make the round trip from Adobe to DaVinci and back more seamless and less error-prone. These tips take the guesswork out of the color grading process.

color grading for video

Color grading is an advanced video editing technique. It allows you to edit the way colors appear on film in post-production. With color grading, you can make scenes more lifelike, achieve a specific look, or infuse emotion into a scene.

In this three-part tutorial on color grading, we’ll cover everything, from basic fundamentals to advanced techniques. Although this tutorial is based on Adobe Premiere Pro and DaVinci Resolve, the process is essentially the same no matter what software you’re using.

Let’s dive into the first episode – color grading fundamentals in Adobe Premiere Pro!

Still Life Video Shoot Lighting Setup

Tabletop shooting is a very specific type of video shoot that can be really hard to get right. Also referred to as still life shooting, it’s very much what it sounds like. Usually, an object is filmed on top of a flat surface in great detail.

Think products, tutorials, or stop motion videos. These classic examples of tabletop filming require a certain level of perfectionism to get right.

In this episode of our How To Video series, Nick LaClair, head of video production for SproutVideo, will walk you through how to properly light a still life video shoot. We’ll specifically address the challenges posed by regular stationary objects, shiny objects, and beverages, with tips for enhancing the end result.

Camera Kits Pros and Cons

When it comes to professional cameras, there is no such thing as “one size fits all”. In this episode of our How To Video series, Nick LaClair, head of video production at SproutVideo, sits down with Michael Rubenstein, freelance photographer and director, to talk about the camera kits they use in the real world on a typical shoot.

They’re two video experts, with two really different cameras – a Sony FS7, and a mirrorless AS7ii. So, which is best? Turns out, it’s not that simple as there are pros and cons to each.

Watch the video below to get a hands-on comparison of footage quality, functionality, and other factors that can make a real difference when choosing which camera to work with.

working with remote video teams

Whether you’re shooting on location, or have offices in different cities, your entire video team is rarely in one place. So, how do you ensure your remote team is communicating effectively, and working efficiently?

Partly from our own experience, we’ve found there are specific tactics you can employ at different stages of the video production process to keep everyone on the same page, and as productive as possible, no matter where they’re located. Keep reading for tips on improving your workflow with remote video teams.

Example of a Video Camera

When it comes to picking a video camera, it’s not just about image quality. The camera also has to offer the type of battery life, audio inputs, video outputs, ergonomics, and image control options to suit your project.

In this episode of our How To Video series, we’ll walk you through what you can expect from different tiers of video cameras for each of those five factors. We’ll also explain why each one is important to consider when selecting a camera for your project.

Factors for Video Image Quality

The image quality can vary significantly between two 4K cameras, as pictured above, but why? Part of the answer is the camera sensor, which we looked at in detail in the last episode of our How To Video series.

However, a lot of the difference also comes down to what happens to the image data after it hits the sensor. There are three main factors: bit rate, bit depth, and chroma subsampling.

If you’re already lost, don’t worry. We’ll break down what each of those terms means, and how they impact footage quality. Watch the video below and keep reading to gain an in-depth understanding of what really makes a difference for pixel perfection.

All About Camera Sensors

Your iPhone shoots 4K, and so does a $50,000 cinema camera. So, what’s the difference? Is all 4K created equal?

The plain and simple answer is a definite NO. As Nick LaClair explains in this episode of our How To Video series, a lot of the difference in footage quality comes down to the role sensors play in processing visual information. Keep reading for a deep dive into how camera sensor size impacts everything, from depth of field and the size of the frame to the level of noise in your image.

Choosing the Right Video Cameras

Image of Video Cameras from Microgen/Shutterstock

There are so many options for cameras on the market. Choosing the right one to purchase, or just to use for a video project, can be challenging. In fact, there really isn’t a single right answer to the question, “Which camera should I use?”

Instead, we’d like to defer to the experts on this topic. We surveyed four professional videographers to learn what they consider to be their go-to camera – the one they reach for time and again. Keep reading for amazing insights into which camera systems the pros use, and why.

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